• Cottage School,  English

    More on Verbs

    I (Christie) briefly mentioned action verbs in last week’s grammar post, but it’s important for your children to understand linking verbs and helping verbs as well. Verbs asserting action are identified easily, yet there are two kinds of action verbs–transitive and intransitive. Also, what makes verbs more complicated is that they don’t always show action. Linking verbs do just what they say they do–they link two words together. Auxiliary or helping verbs do just that–they help other verbs.  Here are some examples of all three types of verbs. Action: Shauna tastes the toast. In this example, the subject is doing the action of the verb. Action verbs can be transitive…

  • Cottage School,  Learning Disabilities

    More On Learning Disabilities

    This is our second post taking a look at learning disabilities–and as promised, this post will focus on what to do if your child does receive a diagnosis–and options available to you if you disagree with the evaluation and findings for your child. First, let’s start with what to do if you have a follow-up meeting with the evaluating school district, and you disagree with the results or findings of the evaluation. After your child’s evaluation is complete, the school will schedule a meeting to review the results, and whether or not the child qualifies for services. It’s important to know that while you may agree with the findings of…

  • Cottage School,  Curriculum

    Choosing Classes and Curriculum

    A few years ago Annie, Jenny, and I (Amelia) were discussing changes we planned to make in our individual homeschools. We each had decided to no longer participate in one of the local large homeschool co-ops but were lamenting a few of the aspects we would miss–namely art and science. So we started thinking about the possibility of meeting once a week to do an art and science class with each other. The support of doing it together made it seem like less work for each of us individually and that appealed to us. The question then became: What would we use for curriculum?   Choosing a curriculum can be challenging.…

  • Cottage School,  Curriculum,  Science

    Teaching Science – Sea Creatures

    This spring semester for science, we studied sea creatures using Apologia’s Exploring Creation series. This is the 3rd book in this series we have used at cottage school, and it has been a helpful curriculum to use as we learn more about God’s creation! The Exploring Creation series has colorful pictures on each page related to what’s being taught.  It also has several hands on activities in each chapter meant to highlight and reinforce what was learned. Another plus is that the experiments use items that mostly can be found in your home. The lessons about sea creatures have been quite informative. (We moms have learned many things we didn’t…

  • Cottage School,  Curriculum,  English

    Nouns and Verbs

    One of the best ways to teach your child about complete sentences is to help them understand the basic parts of a complete sentence, a subject noun and a verb: S V Jesus | wept  “Jesus wept” is a complete sentence on its own because it has those two parts.  Nouns name. This is one of the easiest concepts to teach in English because you simply can look around the room and name people, places, and things around you and your child. Next, name activities and ideas. These aren’t as easy, but you must teach these harder-to-name nouns to your child as well. Swimming (activity) and love (idea) are both…

  • Cottage School,  Curriculum,  English

    Why We Use IEW

    Encouraging young writers to be creative all the while. This program takes a student from writing a paragraph at the beginning of the year all the way to a five-paragraph research paper by the end of the year. It’s simply amazing! As a homeschool mom by day and a college writing instructor by night, I appreciate this curriculum immensely because students can acquire the tools they need to be ready for college writing, yes, I said college writing. If you have zero experience with teaching kids how to write, you can learn yourself with the enormous amount of materials IEW provides for homeschool moms. There are weekly podcasts, teaching seminars…

  • Cottage School,  Learning Disabilities

    Learning Disabilities and Home Education

    Years ago, when my kids were struggling with reading and writing, I remember thinking I was doing something wrong. Why did my 7 year old always seem so upset and struggle with words and letters? Why did his handwriting never improve? Things just seemed much harder than they should be, and it took me a while to link the speech delays two of my children had with potentially other learning disabilities. After finally listening to my gut and seeking advice from some other moms, I looked online and began to suspect that two of my boys may have a learning disability. I reviewed some “signs” of dyslexia – and was…

  • Books,  Cottage School,  Curriculum

    Teaching “A Tree In The Trail”

    One of the great joys of teaching is freshly discovering the subject with the students. Even if you know the material, watching new faces learn new material is thrilling. Our geography class also edifies me since it is mixed with familiar and new content, while we have explored the American landscape and the stories of Holling C. Holling. This spring semester, we studied the landscape and the history of the Southwest as we read, mapped, and explored our way through “Tree in the Trail.” Who doesn’t want to talk about Cowboys and Indians? Their life and times are richly fascinating and full of adventure! We followed a similar pattern to…

  • Cottage School,  Curriculum,  English

    Eight Parts of Speech

    The basic building blocks of any subject is its grammar. We often think of English as the only subject having grammar we must learn, but even riding a bicycle has grammar. We must know the parts of the bicycle like the handlebars, pedals, and brakes before we can even try to ride it. When I hear countless people tell me how much they hate English (because many people love to tell English teachers that for some strange reason–haha), I often wonder how many of them truly tried to memorize the foundation of our language. Before you can identify a run-on or misplaced modifier in your own writing, you have to…

  • Cottage School,  Curriculum

    Science At Home

    Science at home can seem intimidating, especially if you don’t have a background in science.  But with so many resources available, homeschool and #suddenlyhomeschooling parents have a wealth of information and activities a few clicks away.  We have gathered several links of favorite resources we have used at cottage school and in our individual homes.   Home Science Tools If your kids want hands on experiments, this company has tons of great options and their kits include virtually everything you need–including detailed instructions.  Our cottage school has done several of their dissection kits.  They have a new kit that has 6 hands on activities having to do with understanding virus transmission…